Pulaski was incorporated as a town in 1886 and was named after a Revolutionary war hero from Poland, Count Casimir Pulaski. Pulaski was once a thriving industrious area backboned by manufacturing jobs. As the American economy changed, these manufacturing jobs were relocated overseas, which furthered the division between Pulaski County’s upper-middle class and the poor.

With a church on every other block, Pulaski’s deep-rooted faith in Christianity is ever-present. It’s the kind of small town where you might get looked at funny if you don’t have a deep-southern drawl, drive a truck, or go to church on Sunday. Everyone knows everybody and everybody talks about everyone. As the world continues to progress and move forward, long-time residents of Pulaski remain content with keeping things the way they’ve always been.

Pulaski, VA is an ongoing documentary project which explores how religion and poverty have shaped the county of Pulaski, Virginia.

Timothy Frazier (b. 1994) is a photographer interested in photography as a means of documentation. Born in Tampa, Florida, Tim spent his childhood in Saint Lewis, Missouri and Cleveland, Tennessee. Tim studied visual arts at Wells College in Upstate, New York for 3 years before leaving to venture out West. Tim currently resides in Virginia, where he is creating new work that explores the complex relationship people in the South have with fundamental Christianity, on both a group and individual level. Tim also enjoys riding motorcycles and is the founding editor of The Photographic Bandwidth.
View more of Timothy’s work on his website and Instagram.

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